Destinations With Unique Cultural Traditions For Bringing In The New Year

Seeker Editors

Our favorite is taking your suitcase on a roll down your street to attract plenty of travel in the new year- something we are officially incorporating into our own yearly celebrations. There is literally no wrong way to celebrate this fresh start, and these are certainly some fun ways. We decided to commemorate the new year by taking a look at some truly fun, quirky, and fascinating traditions across the globe, all said to bring good fortune, love, and happiness in the new year. Let's jump in Happy New Year from Seeker!

  • Denmark

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      To bring fortunes to your friends in the new year, make sure to have some plates to smash at their doorstep - really! In Denmark, locals make sure to have plenty of smashable dishes to throw at the doorsteps of their friends and family, it is said that the bigger pile of shattered plates- the more luck.

  • Spain

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      New years traditions are considered an important part of local culture in Spain, they are said to bring great luck in the new year. Some beloved Spanish traditions that are said to attract fortune include eating twelve grapes before the clock strikes midnight, wearing cupid's red-colored underwear, and eating a bowl of lentil soup for lunch.

  • Philippines

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      Dress up in your favorite polka dot look this new years eve as in the Philippines this is said to bring good luck, along with plenty other fun yearly traditions that have stood the test of time. Some other quirky traditions to attract good luck to try out; jumping as high as you can when the clock strikes 12, enjoying primarily round-shaped fruits, and *not* eating any chicken or fish dishes.

  • Finland

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      Finnish people make predictions for their new year by casting molten tin into the water- and interpret the future depending on how the shapes form after cooling.

  • Japan

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      While Christmas is generally treated as a romantic holiday in Japan, akin to Valentine's day, the New Year celebration is seen as family time- and lasts until January 3rd. Families gather to visit the temple at midnight and ring in a year of good luck, along with enjoying a traditional Osechi meal, a curated meal that attracts various good fortunes and celebrates the fresh start of the new year.

  • Scotland in Scotland, United Kingdom

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      The "First Footing" is a big deal in Scotland, which means that the very first guest of the New Year to enter a neighbors house must bring a present, such as coal, whisky, or shortbread, to bring luck to the homeowners. Families throughout the neighborhoods of this stunning country can be seen scurrying around the block after midnight on New Year's Eve seeking to bring good fortune to all their loved ones.

  • Colombia

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      Our favorite tradition which we now officially have on our to-do list is rolling around an empty suitcase along the sidewalk to attract more travel in the new year. Columbia has plenty of amazing traditions meant to manifest an exciting future, some other fun ones are to eat exactly *8* grapes at midnight, and to wear yellow underwear.

  • Denmark

    To bring fortunes to your friends in the new year, make sure to have some plates to smash at their doorstep - really! In Denmark, locals make sure to have plenty of smashable dishes to throw at the doorsteps of their friends and family, it is said that the bigger pile of shattered plates- the more luck.

    January 2, 2022
  • Spain

    New years traditions are considered an important part of local culture in Spain, they are said to bring great luck in the new year. Some beloved Spanish traditions that are said to attract fortune include eating twelve grapes before the clock strikes midnight, wearing cupid's red-colored underwear, and eating a bowl of lentil soup for lunch.

    January 2, 2022
  • Philippines

    Dress up in your favorite polka dot look this new years eve as in the Philippines this is said to bring good luck, along with plenty other fun yearly traditions that have stood the test of time. Some other quirky traditions to attract good luck to try out; jumping as high as you can when the clock strikes 12, enjoying primarily round-shaped fruits, and *not* eating any chicken or fish dishes.

    January 2, 2022
  • Finland

    Finnish people make predictions for their new year by casting molten tin into the water- and interpret the future depending on how the shapes form after cooling.

    January 2, 2022
  • Japan

    While Christmas is generally treated as a romantic holiday in Japan, akin to Valentine's day, the New Year celebration is seen as family time- and lasts until January 3rd. Families gather to visit the temple at midnight and ring in a year of good luck, along with enjoying a traditional Osechi meal, a curated meal that attracts various good fortunes and celebrates the fresh start of the new year.

    January 2, 2022
  • Scotland

    The "First Footing" is a big deal in Scotland, which means that the very first guest of the New Year to enter a neighbors house must bring a present, such as coal, whisky, or shortbread, to bring luck to the homeowners. Families throughout the neighborhoods of this stunning country can be seen scurrying around the block after midnight on New Year's Eve seeking to bring good fortune to all their loved ones.

    January 2, 2022
  • Colombia

    Our favorite tradition which we now officially have on our to-do list is rolling around an empty suitcase along the sidewalk to attract more travel in the new year. Columbia has plenty of amazing traditions meant to manifest an exciting future, some other fun ones are to eat exactly *8* grapes at midnight, and to wear yellow underwear.

    January 2, 2022