Pinnacles National Park

One of the younger of the national parks in the NPS is Pinnacles. Born in 2013, it’s hailed for its curious geological formations. It hosts a whopping 48 mammals, including jackrabbits, gray foxes, and bobcats, but is known as the home of the California Condor: the largest land birds in North America.

One of the nation’s newest parks as of 2013, Pinnacles National Park is the dream of hikers and rock climbers the world over. The movement of volcanic fields and fault lines over the course of some 60 million years leaves us today with unparalleled massive, vertical rock spires and steep canyons in Central California.  Campers and climbers come from surrounding areas to witness the flight of at least 80 California Condors that live in the park, a rare species of bird that was once extinct in the wild. In addition to the Condors that run through the wild, in the undeveloped center of the park bats and other wildlife can be found in the talus caves, like Bear Gulch and Balconies, which are scattered throughout the park. 

The Pinnacles National Park reveals a world forged by volcanos and the shifting tectonic plates of California. More than 20 million years ago, multiple mountains blew their lid and spilled lava across a vast swathe of uplands just east of the 101 Highway. Today, it’s a mecca for hikers and cavers, wildlife seekers and wild campers. You can enter from east or west but be sure to mark highlights like the Bear Gulch talus cave and the cross-park High Peaks Trail.

Stop by the visitor center for information about stargazing. Ranger led programs will give you the best experience identifying stars and planets in this remote location.

Pinnacles National Park is made up of rocky, mountainous terrain in the heart of California. Known for wildland terrain and its unique variety of spring wildflowers, Pinnacles National Park attracts visitors from around the world to witness a rich diversity of wildlife, picturesque views, and rugged hiking trails.

Along with unique Californian wildlife, Pinnacles National Park features a versatile terrain encompassed by thousands of gorgeous wildflowers and rich plant life. This mountainous landscape is made up of rare cave formations, oak woodlands, and deep canyons that are home to peregrine falcons, golden eagles, and California condor.

One of the nation’s newest parks as of 2013, Pinnacles National Park is the dream of hikers and rock climbers the world over. The movement of volcanic fields and fault lines over the course of some 60 million years leaves us today with unparalleled massive, vertical rock spires and steep canyons in Central California.  Campers and climbers come from surrounding areas to witness the flight of at least 80 California Condors that live in the park, a rare species of bird that was once extinct in the wild. In addition to the Condors that run through the wild, in the undeveloped center of the park bats and other wildlife can be found in the talus caves, like Bear Gulch and Balconies, which are scattered throughout the park. 

"Pinnacles National Park preserves some of California’s oddest landscapes with out-of-place rock spires and boulder-filled gorges with talus caves just waiting to be explored. Grab your headlamp and head to the west side of Pinnacles National Park for a trek into Balconies Cave. "

Camping, hiking, birding

The Pinnacles National Park reveals a world forged by volcanos and the shifting tectonic plates of California. More than 20 million years ago, multiple mountains blew their lid and spilled lava across a vast swathe of uplands just east of the 101 Highway. Today, it’s a mecca for hikers and cavers, wildlife seekers and wild campers. You can enter from east or west but be sure to mark highlights like the Bear Gulch talus cave and the cross-park High Peaks Trail.

United States California

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