Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park is known for its dark sky that provides prime stargazing every night, easy-access scenic viewpoints, and plentiful friendly walking trails. This park gets quite crowded, attracting visitors from across the world daily, and has great resources for any first-time adventurers through the sprawling, rugged landscape.

Bryce Canyon features the largest collection of Hoodoos in the world, a sprawling desert landscape with lush green areas sparsed throughout and a famously dark sky, this park is a must. Visit for optimal stargazing or to take in the gorgeous preserved landscape that captivates travelers from around the world daily.

A certified "Dark Sky Park", Bryce Canyon is a protected space where not just nature is cherished but the dark night sky that most residential areas slip away from more and more every year. Witness arguably one of the clearest displays of the milky way across the broad sky every night at this gorgeous Utah national park.

Smaller and more remote than either Arches or Zion is Bryce Canyon National Park is technically not quite a canyon. More aptly, this national park is a hoodoo heaven, home to more hoodoos than anywhere else on Earth. These thin, almost impossible-looking red rock spires jut out from the ground like a “fairy chimney,” one of the colloquial names for rocks that can reach up to 200 feet high. These pinnacles make up the majority of Bryce Canyon National Park. While at Bryce, keep an eye out for Utah’s Paunsaugunt Plateau, a collection of hoodoos that look almost like castles formed from millions of years of wind, frost, and streams.  Bryce Canyon offers a solid variety of hiking trails (and winter skiing!), so you can watch the sun rise from behind pink cliffs or set into orange valleys before you take advantage of backcountry campgrounds and dark skies. Road trippers can access the highest point in the park at Rainbow Point, the end of an 18-mile drive that brings you 9,105 feet above sea level and to an overlook of Bryce Canyon’s portion of The Grand Staircase.

Camping, hiking

You can only imagine how the first Mormon pioneers would have felt when they roamed westwards to discover the eye-watering Bryce Canyon back in the 1850s. Probably not unlike how the first visitors to this awesome Utah park feel these days, the moment they lay eyes on that sea of vanilla and vermillion rock, stacked in jagged hoodoos for as far as the eye can see. Rugged doesn’t quite do it justice. Let’s just say you forget the rappel and harness and boots at your peril here.

United States Utah

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